Thursday, August 28, 2014
mhd-hbd:

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.
It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.
Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.
Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.
We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.
People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

Japan is so densely packed with people, that if they had american attitudes a civil war would erupt.

mhd-hbd:

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.

It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.

Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.

Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.

We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.

People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

Japan is so densely packed with people, that if they had american attitudes a civil war would erupt.

(Source: sinnumero)

sanity-schmanity:

raggedymans:

people have been sending in complaints to the BBC about jenny and vastra’s kiss

and people say homophobia no longer exists

THEY ARE MARRIED
WHAT DID YOU THINK LESBIANS DO, A HIGH FIVE?

catskid100:

I think people need to realize that it’s okay to like stuff and not have a deep reason for it

You can like a character because they’re cute, not because you identify with them
You can like a ship because you think they look good together, not because of a deep emotional bond

You can like a song because it’s catchy, not because of the meaningful lyrics

If you like it that’s okay, you don’t have to have deep reason or meaning behind it

aber-flyingtiger:

rupeerose:

teafortrouble:

megg33k:

I need feminism because most men’s restrooms still aren’t equipped with baby changing stations. As someone who was married to a man who had sole custody of his young son, I’m hyperaware that feminism means EQUALITY, not female superiority. Feminism should and does support a man’s right to be as much of a parent to his child(ren) as any mother is allowed/expected to be.

This is a constant problem for Mr. Tea and myself. We’ve got twins, so even though I can change one kid on the change table in the ladies’ room, he’s left standing sort of awkwardly in the lobby with a messy child while I change one, come back, and get the other.

Nobody’s suggesting that men aren’t parents, so the lack of change tables goes well beyond ‘gender role reinforcing’ and straight into ‘ridiculous’.

My dad actually almost got kicked out of a mall once for changing my brother in the womens room of a mall. The only reason they didn’t call the cops on him was because the ladies in the room supported him.

I’d never even considered this but I support it

jaclcfrost:

fun things to imagine any of your favorite characters saying

  • "nyoom"
  • "you’re about to experience the wrath of a god"
  • "you’re about to experience the wrath of a god" (in their best mickey mouse voice)
fishingboatproceeds:

I don’t really understand how that is a question up for discussion on television news. I mean, even putting aside the gajillion ways that white people are privileged by, for instance, being able to think that whiteness is “normal,” studying world history from Eurocentric perspectives,  and etc etc:
- White people are less likely to be arrested for the same crime than black people, and black people serve longer (much longer!) sentences than white people.
- Marijuana use is similar among black and white populations in the U.S., but young African Americans are more than THREE TIMES more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession or use than white Americans. 
- Racial bias in hiring in the U.S. is well-documented and persistent.
- African American students are far more likely to be punished in schools, even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than their white peers.
- Even after accounting for reasons like education disparity, geographical distribution, and occupation, there is a persistent wage gap: White people make are paid more than African Americans due to racial discrimination. 
- White people in the U.S. on average have lower mortgage rates than African Americans.
White privilege is a fact of every facet of American life. I realize I’m mostly preaching to the choir here, but this is not a political issue or a subject for debate. It is well-documented and irrefutable.

fishingboatproceeds:

I don’t really understand how that is a question up for discussion on television news. I mean, even putting aside the gajillion ways that white people are privileged by, for instance, being able to think that whiteness is “normal,” studying world history from Eurocentric perspectives,  and etc etc:

- White people are less likely to be arrested for the same crime than black people, and black people serve longer (much longer!) sentences than white people.

- Marijuana use is similar among black and white populations in the U.S., but young African Americans are more than THREE TIMES more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession or use than white Americans. 

- Racial bias in hiring in the U.S. is well-documented and persistent.

- African American students are far more likely to be punished in schools, even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than their white peers.

- Even after accounting for reasons like education disparity, geographical distribution, and occupation, there is a persistent wage gap: White people make are paid more than African Americans due to racial discrimination. 

- White people in the U.S. on average have lower mortgage rates than African Americans.

White privilege is a fact of every facet of American life. I realize I’m mostly preaching to the choir here, but this is not a political issue or a subject for debate. It is well-documented and irrefutable.

(Source: twitter.com)

hoboandbunny:

psst hey. wanna buy a starship?